Ice for recovery

Ice has been used by professional athletes around the world to improve performance and now you can with the Riixo Recovery Cuff.

The use of ice helps performance by reducing DOMS and muscle soreness as well as improving the muscle function at a cellular level

 

Used with an injury, it can immediately reduce pain and swelling, improving recovery times and reducing further tissue damage.

Recovery advice is always changing but the fundamental component remains the same;

I.C.E.

R.I.C.E.

P.R.I.C.E.

P.O.L.I.C.E

Ice

Compression

Elevation

 

Rest

Ice

Compression

Elevation

 

Protection

Rest

Ice

Compression

Elevation

 

Protection

Optimal Loading

Ice

Compression

Elevation

 

What does ice do for sport recovery?

A by-product, generated by our cells, during sport is lactic acid. Coupled with dehydration, this is what makes our muscles cramp during exercise as well as feel sore and achy the next day, also known as DOMS.

Lactic acid increases the acidity in the muscles causing them to fatigue quickly and also inhibit how well the cells function.

Too much lactic acid = poor performance and sore muscles.

Antiphlogistic effect

The speed that the cells work at is slowed. As a result the production and release of the inflammatory chemicals are slowed down…one of these being Lactic Acid.

Antalgic effect

 

The cold slows down nerve signals reducing the pain signals to the brain…reducing the pain.

Simple.

 

Removal of by-products

The ice gel in the Riixo Recovery Cuff causes the blood vessels to contract and get smaller, coupled with the compression, this increases pressure in the vessels to help flush out Lactic Acid

Muscle relaxant

Cryotherapy can help to reduce tone and spasticity in muscles…helps them to relax…when used frequently after exercise for 20 minutes periods.

What can ice do for injury recovery?

Antiphlogistic effect

The speed that the cells work at is slowed down and as a result the production and release of the inflammatory chemicals are slowed down.

Anti-oedematous effect

“Oedema” means swelling. Cryotherapy causes the blood vessels to contract and get smaller this does two things;

 

Antalgic effect

 

The cold slows down nerve signals reducing the pain signals to the brain…reducing the pain.

Simple.

 

The three phases of injury healing

1

The inflammatory phase

The inflammatory phase. This is the body protecting itself by flooding the area with fluid for 48hrs, it is essential but too much fluid is bad as it stretches the soft tissue. This is why we ice and apply compression. Riixo Recovery Cuffs can help to manage the swelling.

Never use heat during this phase because heat increases the blood flow into the injured area and increases the amount of swelling.

2

The proliferation phase

Like a cut on the arm the body begins to repair, new tissue and scar tissue are formed at the injury site. Heat can now be applied to the injured area to facilitate the healing process.
3

The remodelling phase

This is the process of returning to health: the restoration of structure and function of the injured tissue. The healing process includes blood clotting, tissue mending, scarring and bone healing. Heat therapy can also be used during this phase.

References

  1. Scott F. Nadler, DO, FACSM, Kurt Weingand, PhD, DVM, and Roger J. Kruse, MD; The Physiologic Basis and Clinical Applications of Cryotherapy and Thermotherapy for the Pain Practitioner, pain physician, 2004. 1A
  2. Bleakley C.,McDonough S.,MacAuley D., The Use of Ice in the Treatment of Acute Soft-Tissue Injury: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials, The American Journal of Sports Medicine; 2004. 1A
  3. Tricia J. Hubbard et al., Does Cryotherapy Improve Outcomes With Soft Tissue Injury? Journal of Athletic Training, 2004. 1A
  4. Ernst E., Fialka V., Ice freezes pain? A review of the clinical effectiveness of analgesic cold therapy, J pain symptoms manage, 1994. 5
  5. Amin A. Algafly, Keith P. George, The effect of cryotherapy on nerve conduction velocity, pain threshold and pain tolerance, Br J Sports Med, 2007. 3B
  6. V. Hurley et al., Non-exercise physical therapies for musculoskeletal conditions, Best Practice & Research, Clinical Rheumatology, 2008. 1C
  7. Oosterveld F.G., Rasker J.J., Treating arthritis with locally applied heat or cold, semin Arthritis Rheum., 1994. 5